Portfolio > Planet Celadon: Mission Completed, stills

Planet Celadon: Operation Completed (2020) continues Genevieve Quick's Planet Celadon: Our Receiver is Operating (2018). In this series of works she employs the traditional celadon ceramic glaze, widespread throughout East Asia, as the framework for a fantastical narrative for Asian American diasporic identity, where she exaggerates ideas of alienness that converge with futurity and tradition. In this new video, Quick uses aeronautical surface to air body gestures and symbols along with the sounds and icons of computer graphics, Google Earth, and early computer games as analogies for communication with extraterrestrial life. As communication is established, the narrative chronicles the landing of the Celadonians to Earth, aboard the Rockette Ship, a meteorite-like vessel that lands in Asia.

Featuring compositions by Adria Otte.

Special thanks to the Wattis Institute, San Francisco Arts Commission, and Center for Cultural Innovation for supporting this project.
Planet Celadon: Operation Completed (2020) continues Genevieve Quick's Planet Celadon: Our Receiver is Operating (2018). In this series of works she employs the traditional celadon ceramic glaze, widespread throughout East Asia, as the framework for a fantastical narrative for Asian American diasporic identity, where she exaggerates ideas of alienness that converge with futurity and tradition. In this new video, Quick uses aeronautical surface to air body gestures and symbols along with the sounds and icons of computer graphics, Google Earth, and early computer games as analogies for communication with extraterrestrial life. As communication is established, the narrative chronicles the landing of the Celadonians to Earth, aboard the Rockette Ship, a meteorite-like vessel that lands in Asia.

Featuring compositions by Adria Otte.

Special thanks to the Wattis Institute, San Francisco Arts Commission, and Center for Cultural Innovation for supporting this project.

Currently showing in
Why are they so afraid of a lotus?
Nanyang Technological University, Centre for Contemporary Art, Singapore

October 24, 2020–January 10, 2021
http://ntu.ccasingapore.org/events/why-are-they-so-afraid-of-a-lotus/